Will This Be On the Test?


While reading this book to the Toddler last night, I was treated to a little geography lesson:

Me: Whooping crane, whooping crane, what do you....

Toddler: PandabearsliveinShhhina.WeliveinCanada.Awright?

Me: Uh... Er... Yeah. I got it.

He wasn't being snarky. He was only relating to me what he'd learned earlier that day from The Lovely Wife. The "Alright" part is pure Toddler; it's his way of saying, "are ya with me on this?" It's quickly become one of those endearing speech nuances that you secretly hope he doesn't outgrow.

Examples:

"We can play trains. You can be Henry and I can be Thomas, awright? Awright."

"We can ride the tricycle. Tricycle's not tired. Tricycle's not sleeping. Awright?Awright."

One doesn't even get a chance to mount a decent opposition. Your silent acquiescence is his carte blanche.

Oh, and by the way: Birds have beaks. We have mouths.

Awright?

(Strangely enough, yesterday's entry over at Dooce could not have prepared me any better for this situation. I think I'm comparing our respective children's development enough, thankyouverymuch.)

Posted bythemikestand at 9:05 AM  

4 stepped up to the mike:

sween said... 9:57 AM, September 21, 2006  

That's just sweet as candy.

Reminds me of My Lovely Wife's 1 year-old second cousin Adam -- almost no real words, but why do you need words when he has made his own -- "Nanu" -- which means "I want [indicated item/activity/attention]". It's surprisingly effective.

Sassy said... 10:21 AM, September 21, 2006  

That is adorable. Our little cousin Nicole's key word is "now." But not in that demanding 3-year-old way, in the "Oh please please can we do this now??" way. Precious.

Dustin said... 4:17 PM, September 22, 2006  

Don't lie, your son orders you around and his "awright" is actually toddler speak for "do it, or I soil your frisbee!"

Chair said... 1:55 AM, September 26, 2006  

We were having the Beak discussion the other day and Theya was carefully pondering the fact that only birds had beaks until she turned to me and said, "and Gryphons, too!"

OMG kid.

"Yes, honey! You're right! Gryphons do have beaks, but that's because they're half bird!"

Mixing my husband's and my biology back grounds with a penchant for medieval decor has our 23 month old gaining an understanding of zoological morphology.

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